Wild Horse Symmetry

"The desire of symmetry, for balance, for rhythm in all forms as well as in sound, is one of the most inveterate of humans instincts." - Edith Warthon


Why is symmetry important in photography and art? Is it simply because it is pleasing to view balance? Or is there something deeper, on an emotional level, that affects us when we perceive symmetry or the lack of ?

Creating a great image doesn't end after you release the shutter. Granted, photographers understand that composing a shot is crucial and the more you get "in camera" the better it will be later once you process the image in film or digital dark room. Creating that perfect photograph requires culling hundreds of images to find the right combination of light, emotion, and sometimes symmetry. It's the same with wild horse photography.

Composition can alter the meaning of an image in drastic ways and completely change what you see. Sometimes pure symmetry and balance are what makes an image - symmetry of lines, balance between light and shadows, etc. But at times a lack of symmetry can bring out a particular emotion or draw attention to the focal point of an image.

In the simple and minimalistic style, I pursue with my photography, I frequently use a lack of symmetry and a lot of negative space to eliminate clutter and focus attention on what I've seen through my lens - see "Beyond the Mountains" fromm my Onaqui collection for example. for example. However, in the above image, the nearly perfect symmetry and the story it tells is too interesting to ignore.

"Symmetry" is the new addition to the American Wild collection.



Maria Marriott, wild horse photographer, black and white wild horse photography

An equestrian for most of her life, Maria combines her passion for horses with her art and the desire to bring public awareness to the American wild horses. Maria Marriott Photography is a proud supporter of several non-profit organizations that tirelessly work to ensure the well-being of the American mustangs.

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